Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

 
How is Teaching American History in South Carolina funded?
How does Teaching American History in South Carolina work?
Who can participate in a TAHSC Summer Institute?
What is the main goal of the project?
 
 
How is Teaching American History in South Carolina funded?
Teaching American History in South Carolina is part of a nationwide Teaching American History federal grant program funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Innovation and Improvement. As part of a federal program that has funded over 800 grant projects around the country, South Carolina's first Teaching American History grant was awarded in October 2001. Richland School District 2 was the primary recipient of this $953,361 award, with the South Carolina Department of Archives and History contracted to administer the 3-year grant project. In July 2004, the U.S. Department of Education awarded Teaching American History in South Carolina another 3-year grant of $999,558. Richland School District 2 was the primary recipient again, with administration contracted to the South Carolina Department of Archives and History. A third grant of $999,829 was awarded in July 2007. This project builds on the success of first grant, offering content-rich professional development to a new coalition of school districts. To see grant narratives and other information, go to this page.
 
How does Teaching American History in South Carolina work?
Teaching American History in South Carolina provides professional development support to teachers by offering a series of 10-day summer institutes that take place in three regions of the state (Pee Dee, Upstate, and Midlands). A history professor, or master scholar, leads the course, providing content instruction in American history. Participants also take part in master teacher workshops and cultural institution presentations. Class takes place at a variety of local museums, libraries, and historic sites across the state. All activities utilize local primary source materials or objects relating to the periods or themes being studied. Participants conduct primary source research that will be used to create original lessons. During the fall and winter months, teachers receive continuous research support to develop curriculum-based lessons based upon their experiences during the institutes. Much of this research support is aimed at identifying local primary sources (and cultural resources in general) for use in the classroom. Participating teachers from all three regions finally come together for a midyear retreat to share experiences and lesson plans.
 
Who can participate in a TAHSC Summer Institute?
Summer Institutes are open to all South Carolina teachers. Teachers from districts in the Pee Dee, Upstate, and Midlands are especially encouraged to apply. Enrollment for each institute is limited to 20 teachers. Participants are selected according to their professional development needs regarding content knowledge, curriculum alignment, innovative teaching strategies, and assessment practices that will improve student interest and learning in American History.
 
What is the main goal of the project?
The main goal of the project is to help teachers develop innovative teaching techniques through the use of local primary sources and to connect national history to local and regional events, people, and places. The partnerships created through grant activities will live beyond the grant period and foster continued support of teacher development and improved student achievement in American history.