Governor Francis W. Pickens' Proclamation Convening Legislature to Elect Electors of President and Vice President and two Senators, July 1861

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Document Description:

In July of 1861, ‘According to an Act of the Confederate Congress, entitled, “An Act to put in to Operation the Government under the permanent constitution of the Confederate States of American,”’ required that South Carolina Governor Francis W. Pickens reconvene the General Assembly to elect Electors for the offices of President and Vice President of the Confederacy and two Senators to the Confederate Congress.

Citation:

Proclamation Convening Legislature to Elect Electors of President and Vice President and two Senators.  6 July 1861.  S511001.  Letters, Telegrams, and Proclamations. Governor Francis W. Pickens papers.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Transcription:

State of South Carolina
Executive Department
July 6, 1861

According to an Act of the Confederate Congress, entitled, “An Act to put in to Operation the Government under the permanent constitution of the Confederate States of American,” it is required that each State shall vote, on the first Wednesday in November next, for President and Vice-President of the Confederate States, which officers are to be inaugurated or the twenty-second of February next, and whereas the existing law of the State provides that the Electors for President and Vice-President, shall be appointed by the Legislatures, and whereas the Legislature of this State will not be in regular session at the time prescribed by the aforesaid Act, for appointment of Electors. –

­Therefore- be it known that I, F.W. Pickens, Governor in and over the State of South Carolina, by virtue of the power vested in me by the Constitution, authorizing the Governor, on extraordinary accessions, to converse the (pg.2) General Assembly, Do issue this, my Proclamation, calling upon and requesting the Senators and the Members of the House of Representatives to convene in Columbia on the first Monday in November next ensuring, that they may be present in the House of Representatives on the said first Wednesday in November, to appoint Electors of President and Vice President of the Confederate States, in conformity with the Act of the Confederate Congress aforesaid.

As the permanent Government is to be organized, an election will be required, of two Senators from this States, and also, in all probability, considering the peculiar State of the Country, other important matters will be acted on at the same session of the Legislature.  Given under my hand and the seal of the State aforesaid, at Columbia, this, the sixth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, and in the eighty-sixth year of the Independence of the State of South Carolina

Signed F.W. Pickens

Isaac H. Means

Secry. of State

Correlating SC Social Studies Academic Standards:

Standard 3-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the events that led to the Civil War, the course of the War and Reconstruction, and South Carolina’s role in these events.

Indicator 3-4.4 Outline the course of the Civil War and South Carolina’s role in significant events, including the Secession Convention, the firing on Fort Sumter, the Union blockade of Charleston, and Sherman’s march through South Carolina.

Standard 4-6: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the Civil War and its impact on America.

Indicator 4-6.3 Explain how specific events and issues led to the Civil War, including the sectionalism fueled by issues of slavery in the territories, states’ rights, the election of 1860, and secession.

Standard 8-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the American Civil War—its causes and effects and the major events that occurred during that time.

Indicator 8-3.4 Compare the attitudes of the unionists, cooperationists, and secessionists in South Carolina and summarize the reasons that the members of the South Carolina secession convention in 1860 voted unanimously to secede from the Union, including concerns about states’ rights and fears about abolition.

Standard USHC-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the causes and the course of the Civil War and Reconstruction in America.

Indicator USHC-4.2 Explain how the political events and issues that divided the nation led to civil war, including the compromises reached to maintain the balance of free and slave states, the successes and failures of the abolitionist movement, the conflicting views on states’ rights and federal authority, the emergence of the Republican Party and its win in 1860, and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

Additional Flash Versions:

Pickens Proclamation 1 Pickens Proclamation 2

 

Related Documents:

A.G. Magrath Letter to J.W. Hayne concerning Fort Sumter

Governor Pickens Letter to President Jefferson Davis as to R.E. Lee

Letters between Governor Francis W. Pickens and President James Buchanan

 

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