Articles of Agreement between the Lords Proprietors, 1674 

Printable PDF Version: Large Document

Printable PDF Version: Lords Agreement

Document Description:

These "Articles indented of seven parts" constituted a legal contract between seven of the eight owners of what became North and South Carolina. Here the seven agreed to pay for further supplies for the fledgling settlement on the Ashley River. The seal at the far right is blank because Sir Peter Colleton was in Barbados serving as acting governor, but he sent word that he approved of the new contract. The eighth proprietor, Sir William Berkeley, was excluded because he had failed to finance his share of the venture; the other proprietors were then trying to buy him out. John Locke's statements that he had witnessed two of the signatures are on the back of the document.

For more information, see Charles H. Lesser. South Carolina Begins: The Records of a Proprietary Colony, 1663-1721. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, 1995.

Citation:

Carolina Lords Proprietors. Articles of Agreement between the Lords Proprietors.  1674.  Constitutional and Organic Papers, S131003.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History.  Columbia, SC.

Transcription:

Click here for a PDF file of a trancription taken from pages 431-435 of The Shaftesbury Papers published by the South Carolina Historical Society and reprinted by Arcadia Publishing in 1999.

Correlating SC Social Studies Academic Standards:

Standaard 3-2: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the exploration and settlement of South Carolina and the United States.

Indicator 3-2.6 Summarize the contributions of settlers in South Carolina under the Lords Proprietors and the Royal colonial government, including the English from Barbados and the other groups who made up the diverse European population of early South Carolina. (H, G)

Standard 8-1: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the settlement of South Carolina and the United States by Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans.

Indicator 8-1.5 Summarize the significant changes to South Carolina’s government during the colonial period, including the proprietary regime and the period of royal government, and the significance of the Regulator movement.

 

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