Pamphlet regarding women's right and equal suffrage ("Platform Adopted by the Equal Suffrage League of South Carolina"), 1914

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Document Description:

The Equal Suffrage League of South Carolina was formed to protect the rights of women in a time when they had very little legal standing.  This group was a part of a larger national movement to secure suffrage and other rights for women.  This pamphlet from 1914 outlines the group’s founding social and political objectives.  Some of the goals of the Equal Suffrage League included obtaining equal guardianship of children by their mother and father, equal wages for men and women, eight hour workdays, temperance, and equal educational opportunities.  Although the Nineteenth Amendment would be ratified by the United States in 1920, it would take the better part of the twentieth century for women to achieve many of the goals this platform demanded.

Citation:

"'Platform Adopted by the Equal Suffrage League of South Carolina."  1914.  Ida Salley Reamer Papers.  Manuscripts Division, South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.

Correlating SC Social Studies Academic Standards: 

Standard 5-3: The student will demonstrate an understanding of major domestic and foreign developments that contributed to the United States’ becoming a world power.

Indicator 5-3.5 Explain how building cities and industries led to progressive reforms, including labor reforms, business reforms, and Prohibition.

Standard 8-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of major social, political, and economic developments that took place in the United States during the second half of the nineteenth century.

Indicator 8-5.1 Summarize the political, economic, and social conditions in South Carolina following the end of Reconstruction, including the leadership of Wade Hampton and the so-called Bourbons or Redeemers, agricultural depression and struggling industrial development, the impact of the temperance and suffrage movements, the development of the 1895 constitution, and the evolution of race relations and Jim Crow laws.

Standard 8-6: The student will demonstrate an understanding of South Carolina’s development during the early twentieth century.

Indicator 8-6.1 Summarize the progressive reform movement in South Carolina, including the motivation of progressives; child labor laws; Prohibition; improvements to roads, hospitals, and libraries; tax reforms; changes to local government systems; and the roles of significant state governors and women’s groups.

Standard USHC-5: The student will demonstrate an understanding of major social, political, and economic developments that took place in the United States during the second half of the nineteenth century.

Indicator USHC-5.4 Analyze the rise of the labor movement, including the composition of the workforce of the country in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, and skills; working conditions for men, women, and children; and union protests and strikes and the government’s reactions to these forms of unrest.

Indicator USHC-5.7 Compare the accomplishments and limitations of the progressive movement in effecting social and political reforms in America, including the roles of Theodore Roosevelt, Jane Addams, W. E. B. DuBois, and Booker T. Washington.

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Equal Suffrage League Platform Equal Suffrage League Platform

 

 

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