Letters from Governor Richard I. Manning regarding prohibition, September-November 1918

 

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Document Description:

Letter 1: Letter written to J. Elmore Martin, Sheriff of Charleston, from Governor Manning, requesting that he send a detail to Florence to investigate a violation of the Prohibition Law.

Letter 2: Letter written to J. Elmore Martin from Governor Manning requesting that he once again, look into violations of the Prohibition Law in Florence.

Letter 3: Letter from to Governor Manning from Chief State Constable Smyrl, tells about the current whisky situation in the state. Smyrl writes that most of the alcohol is being transported from Baltimore, Maryland, and that people are mostly getting intoxicated off of extracts and patent medicines, not whiskey. Smyrl also writes that they are having complaints from all over the state, but mostly around the military camps.

Letter 4: Letter from Chief State Constable Smyrl to Governor Manning, informing him of the possibility that railroad hands are helping to transport illegal liquors. Smyrl requests that extra agents or officers are provided to help deal with the problem.

Letter 5: Letter from Governor Manning to the Mayor of Florence, informing him that he will be sending a State Constable there to help inforce the Prohibition laws. Governor Manning also writes that he will be given as many officers as he needs and that he hope to here how things progress.

Citation:

Richard I. Manning to J. Elmore Martin, 27 September 1918.  General Correspondence.  Governor Richard Irvine Manning papers.  Box 1.  S534005. South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Governor’s Office to J. Elmore Martin, 3 October 1918.  General Correspondence.  Governor Richard Irvine Manning papers.  Box 1.  S534005.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Chief State Constable to Governor Richard I. Manning, 19 October 1918.  General Correspondence.  Governor Richard Irvine Manning papers.  Box 1. S534005.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Chief State Constable to Richard I. Manning, 28 October 1918.  General Correspondence.  Governor Richard Irvine Manning papers.  Box 1.  S534005.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Governor’s Office to Mayor of Florence, 2 November 1918.  General Correspondence.  Governor Richard Irvine Manning papers.  Box 1. S534005.  South Carolina Department of Archives and History, Columbia, South Carolina.

Correlating SC Social Studies Academic Standards: 

Standard 5-4: The student will demonstrate an understanding of the economic boom-and-bust in America in the 1920s and 1930s, its resultant political instability, and the subsequent worldwide response.

Indicator 5-4.1 Summarize changes in daily life in the boom period of the 1920s, including the improved standard of living; the popularity of new technology such as automobiles, airplanes, radio, and movies; the Harlem Renaissance and the Great Migration; Prohibition; and racial and ethnic conflict.

Standard 8-6: The student will demonstrate an understanding of South Carolina’s development during the early twentieth century.

Indicator 8-6.1 Summarize the progressive reform movement in South Carolina, including the motivation of progressives; child labor laws; Prohibition; improvements to roads, hospitals, and libraries; tax reforms; changes to local government systems; and the roles of significant state governors and women’s groups.

Indicator 8-6.4 Explain the causes and the effects of changes in South Carolina culture during the 1920s, including Prohibition, the boll weevil, the rise of mass media, increases in tourism and recreation, the revival of the Ku Klux Klan, and the Southern Literary Renaissance.

Standard USHC-7:  The student will demonstrate an understanding of the economic boom-and-bust in America in the 1920s and 1930s, its resultant political instability, and the subsequent worldwide response.

Indicator USHC-7.3 Explain the causes and effects of the social conflict and change that took place during the 1920s, including the role of women and their attainment of the right to vote, the “Red Scare” and the Sacco and Vanzetti case, the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, immigration quotas, Prohibition, and the Scopes trial.

Additional Flash Versions:

Letter 1: J. Elmore Martin Letter 1
Letter 2: J. Elmore Martin Letter 2 Letter 3: Chief State Constable Letter 1 Letter 4: Chief State Constable Letter 2 Letter 5: Mayor of Florence Letter

 

 

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